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20121003
20121003
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is tha
the first-ever televised debate richard nixon chose to wear no makeup. with a 5:00 shadow he looked sweaty and uncomfortable compared to the tanned, relaxed john f. kennedy. then voters heard the impatient sighs of al gore. it was clear by the microphones while george w. bush was talking. it played into a larger narrative into the campaigns. it re-inforced what the audience thought about the candidates. >> when gore sighed endlessly and moaned during the debate and we saw that on television, it just emphasized the idea that he was arrogant and condescending, something people were already concerned about. when nixon was sweating, there was some sense that he was already shifty and there was an anxiety in his soul as well as his body. >> that's what the question in this campaign is about. >> reporter: in a later debate that year gore appeared to invade the personal space of bush. >> i believe i can. >> reporter: a move which made him look awkward compared to his relaxed opponent. in 1992 george h.w. bush was caught twice by cameras glancing at his watch during a town hall debate with voters
were seen as pivotal in affecting the outcome. that was 1960, where the jfk-richard nixon debates where richard nixon appeared sweaty and uncomfortable and then 2000 where al gore was seen as sighing and sort of dismissive of then texas governor george bush. so when you asked jen and barbara whether they were giving their candidates advice on things that are aesthetic, they should be. >> that's what we all remember, right, do you wear the gray suit on black and white tv, nixon. let me ask this, because you've done a lot of work on this. super pacs and the candidates are competing for money, which a lot of people might not realize. but the campaign can cover whatever it wants with the money, the super pac not linked to the campaign at all so not ideal for the campaign. the romney campaign, $86 million raised. the pro romney super pac, $41 million. and american crossroads, affiliate with karl rove, $58.7 million. so you can add that up and get a big number or say if karl rove doesn't like how mitt romney does tomorrow night, he could give a lot of that $60 million, the biggest chunk of ch
announcer ] humana. lou: joining us now katie microlending holding the post under nixon ford and reagan. start with "the washington post" getting the next round of sensitive documents lying on the floor in the consulate of benghazi this is outrageous. >> three weeks later we cannot send in the fbi it is too dangerous but the reporters are picking up sensitive documents talking about the people in libya. three weeks later. lou: not securing a because we have no personnel i know people in the fbi and i have the highest respect one of my oldest friends is there. the idea they make them look like in the tent and even want to continue the description to make them look horrible. >> it was either a massive intelligence failure to not know the was a security threat to and if not then a massive security failure to not protect them. either way it is now a cover up. remember the youtube movie? they said the intelligence community said it was there fault. lou: one of the where does things i have never seen comes out with the statement on a friday and has not appeared in public he could be in a rive
. and the experienced vice president richard nixon seemed uncomfortable, even sweaty. as the debate's producer, the late don hewitt, remembered. >> i looked at him on camera and i thought, oh, my god, this is trouble. >> reporter: the first lesson: the debates would not just be about what you said but how you looked when you said it. and mistakes could have huge consequences. in 1976 at the height of the cold war, president gerald ford mysteriously declared -- >> there is no soviet domination of eastern europe. >> reporter: he lost to jimmy carter. but in 1984, another incumbent, ronald reagan, used the debates to diffuse criticism of his advancing age. >> you already are the oldest president in history. >> reporter: he was 73 at the time. >> i am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. (laughter) >> "i was smiling" watt walter mondale later said "but i knew he'd gotten me there." other lessons, it may be best not to start your opening statement this way. >> who am i? why am i here? >> reporter: as admiral james stockdale, ross pro's running mate did, in 1992. d
america's meant to be. >> and there, there's nixon with the flop sweat. george h.w. bush looking at his watch. appearances count, don't they? >> they really do. and a professional knows that. george h.w. bush in that debate, that third one in richmond in 1992, he was looking at his watch because he was trying to make the point that one of the other candidates had run over time. it didn't really compute this was sending the message that he was impatient, just the kind of message he didn't want to send. >> humor can be an effective tool, diffuse a weakness. >> i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. >> and at that moment, a lot of people said well, there's the ball game. including his opponent. >> including walter mondale. >> what do you think about humor as a tool in this debate tonight? >> you'd better be a very accomplished actor like reagan or else it probably won't work. in that case, reagan said certain things that might have given rise to further worry he was too old to serve a second term
to have you here. >> good morning. >> martha: let's start with the classic, which is the nixon-kennedy debate. and folks who watched it on television clearly thought jack kennedy was the winner, but that wasn't necessarily the response of people who didn't get to see it. >> yeah. there was actually four debates. it was the first presidential debate series. people that listened to it on the radio, which was the majority of radios, thought nixon won on substance. people who watched, thought kennedy did. kennedy was tanned and had make-up on. nixon did not. he came out of the hospital a few days earlier. he was gone. it showed. he sweat a lot and the impression people left with was he was shifty can kennedy was in command. >> martha: he refused make-up apparently, which is probably a candidate made that mistake. let's look at carter-reagan, a fascinating one to watch. we have a little bit of sound from it. we want to get your thoughts on that. let's play that. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, gone his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> the
the first kennedy/nixon debate where kennedy defied the expectations that he was a rich light weight playboy and won the debate as much as nixon lost it. in 1980 reagan defies expectations because people -- there was a character that the carter campaign created of him of a nuclear cowboy. it is none of those things. >> carter also was asking about nuclear war. >> what romney has to do is forget the nonsense about it being about himself. if you are a 65-year-old man you are not comfortable in your own skin you never will be. he has to talk to the american people. he has to have a conversation with the american people and get them to see him as a president. >> has he? >> no he has not. >> why not? >> his convention speech he has run a personality campaign and nobody is going to out personality barack obama. >> for romney to just breakthrough what looks like an increasing race in which he has fewer chances to change the dynamics. obama has to just not make it and he wins. this is a tough situation for a challenger particularly on the first debate. the pressure is on domestic policy. and so this
f. kennedy and richard nixon squared off in the very first televised debate. while nixon was known for being a fierce debater on camera he looked nervous, sweating profusely under the hot camera lights, whereas kennedy looked calm, cool, collected. forces those that watched the debate, kennedy was the winner, but for those who listened to the debate on radio, they thought nixon won. in the end it was kennedy who won the presidential race. well, of course, humor can also have an affect on the debates. 1908 ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president jimmy carter for his stance on health care, but reagan won fans with his response. check it out. >> governor reagan, again, typically is against such a proposal. >> governor, there you go again. >> all right. want to bring in presidential historian douglas brinkley. good to see you, as always. let's just start by seeing that moment. how significant was that between carter and reagan? >> oh, it was big. if you go back to 1980, you have jimmy carter, the sitting president, but he had double digit inflation, long gasoline lines, and iran
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)